Tag Archives: tutorial

The Master Game Schedule

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I love criticism because it means I can do something better. One of the biggest criticisms Atlanta Youth Lacrosse received this past Spring Season was the lack of a Master Game Schedule, and that the schedule changed from week to week. This criticism was valid for two reasons. One, there was no Master Game Schedule. Two, our lovely Director, Mary Jo Corsetti, organized the weekly schedule because our fields were available at different times each week. After spending the last two weeks setting up the Fall Schedule my hat is off to my mother for many years of putting together schedules week after week.

Because this criticism ranked highest among the things AYL could improve on, I set out to find a quality program that would allow us to provide all members with a Master Game Schedule. Well, I lucked out tremendously with League Toolbox. This company creates and continually improves upon a host of league management software tools. On top of ridiculously good and timely customer support, League Toolbox knew more about creating schedules than I thought possible.

Because of League Toolbox’s tools, this season we offer three distinct methods of viewing the Fall Ball Schedule:

  • Download the Master Game Schedule
    • Perfect if you want to cross out games as we move through the season.
  • Dynamic Master Game Schedule: http://ayllax.leaguetoolbox.com/league/schedule.php
    • This schedule allows you to select “division” and “team”
    • For example, select “3/4th Grade” and “Outlaws,” and you will be directed to the Outlaw’s Individual Team Schedule
  • Individual Team Websites Next Game Banner
    • Get familiar with your team’s website. Every time you visit the homepage you will see a list of upcoming games on the left, and a large banner displaying your team’s next game, opponent, location, and time.

Remember, all of this information is accessible at: www.ayllax.com/master-game-schedule. If you forget when to show up for a game just check the schedule, and it will be there waiting for you.

Finally, I put together a short video tutorial. This video details how to access the Master Game Schedule, and all the different formats it is presented in.

As always, if you have comments or questions, please post them below in the comment section.

Cheers,
Gordon

So You Want to be an Official?

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You have read Every Lacrosse Signal, and Off The Book Rules. Now you think you might want to be a lacrosse official. As a current official who loves my job I highly encourage any person to pick up officiating. So long as you don’t mind a job where:

  • You make fifty percent of the spectators angry
  • You are always wrong
  • You are expected to be perfect
  • You are responsible for keeping players safe
  • Everyone thinks they can do a better job than you
  • You get to wear stripes, so you’ll always look thinner

If you still want to be a lacrosse official after reading that, then welcome to the club! I will be your helpful guide as you learn the fundamental skills.

Every lacrosse official needs to perform five basic tasks:

  1. Look the part
  2. Blow the whistle loudly
  3. Throw the flag high
  4. Give clear and obvious signals
  5. Relay penalties to the scorer’s table

In my experience, if you do those five things during a game you can do a competent job. I am not going to spend eight paragraphs explaining each of these tasks. Instead, I created the following five videos that show how to do each of the five tasks every lacrosse official needs to have down pat. Practice them before you hit the field, and you will be in good shape to start the game.

Featured Image Credit – www.minnesotafunfacts.com

Make sure to read the blog tomorrow morning. I’ll be posting information about an officiating clinic for any 5th through 12th graders, and any parents, interested in officiating at AYL this Fall Season.

Cheers,
Gordon

Every Lacrosse Signal

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This week is Rules/Officiating week. Two quick things before we dive in: The last post of the week will detail an officiating camp open to all 5th-12th grade AYL players, and any parents who are interested in officiating. Second, I will be detailing youth rules that may not be implemented in your local league. I highly encourage fellow youth lacrosse leagues to consider implementing one or two of the rules I will discuss that drastically improve player skills and are easy to get the hang of. Now, onto every lacrosse signal!

During my sideline Q & A sessions, I often get asked what a particular signal means. I explain the offsides signal, crease violation signal, illegal procedure signal, and more. I always get eyeballs that light up in understanding from the fans, especially youth parents who are brand new to the game. This sideline Q & A is not just great for the fans, it also helps me and my officiating partner during the second half. Because all the fans now recognize that the official knows the game, and they relax and enjoy the game even more since they now know what the officials are signaling.

All official lacrosse signals can be found in the back pages of the NFHS Boys Lacrosse Rulebook. They are broken down into three categories:

  1. Procedural Signals (timeouts, goals, stalling, counts, failure to advance, etc)
  2. Personal Fouls (slashing, tripping, unsportsmanlike conduct, ejection, etc)
  3. Technical Fouls (pushing, illegal procedure, warding, conduct foul, etc)

The video below details every signal in the back of the NFHS rulebook. After watching it you will be able to identify what any US Lacrosse-trained official is signaling during any lacrosse game. Also, any youth players who are interested in officiating can improve their signaling by practicing the signals in this video.


Cheers,
Gordon