Tag Archives: lou corsetti

Speaking At The 2014 US Lacrosse National Convention

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Coach Lou Corsetti and I are speaking once again at the 2014 US Lacrosse National Convention! This will be Lou’s 15th time speaking and my second time.

Coach Lou is speaking to men’s coaches from 9-10AM on Sunday, January 12th on “Progressive Shooting that Becomes the Foundation Of Your Offense“. He’ll be on the demo field explaining how to run progressive shooting drills that encourage players to shoot and look for additional options if denied a good shooting opportunity. He is representing Atlanta Youth Lacrosse and the Riverwood High School Lacrosse Program.

Last year I spoke to youth coaches about getting players to effectively work together as a team. This year I am co-speaking with fellow officials trainer Greg Hite. We are speaking to adult officials about how to better train youth officials from 2-3PM on Saturday, January 11th in our presentation, “Training Youth Officials Without Making Their Heads Explode“. Greg and I are representing our work at Atlanta Lacrosse Official and the Georgia Lacrosse Officials Association.

We are both looking forward to seeing a lot of old friends in Philly, and making a bunch of new ones!

If I have the time I will try to do some live-blogging of the convention while we are up there.

Featured Image Credit – www.uslacrosse.org

Cheers,
Gordon

This one is for you Dad

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Last night I had the honor and pleasure of watching my father, Lou Corsetti, be inducted into the Georgia Lacrosse Hall of Fame Class of 2011. Aristotle once said that “dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.” I always felt my dad deserved every award he received because he never concerned himself with collecting them but in earning them. I often joke with players and parents that Coach Corsetti is a great man on the lacrosse field, but that I live with him twenty-four seven. That puts me in an interesting position that will hopefully illuminate some of my father’s character to those who only get to see it an hour or two at a time.

As with many memories the difficult and challenging ones stand out the most often. My first challenging lacrosse memory came in the sixth grade at Murphy Candler Park at the original Atlanta Youth Lacrosse. I made a mistake and my coach pulled me off the field. Needless to say I did not find that fair at all. I stomped to the end of the bench, threw my stick onto the ground and parked my rear end on the ground and sulked. For the rest of the game I held my head in my hands until the final horn blew. After the game I stuffed my gear into my bag tossed it into the back seat of the car and sulked once again in the front seat. Then my coach sat down in the driver’s seat and quietly told me, “Gordon, when I pulled you off the field I was going to put you back in again but because you sulked and did not support your team on the bench I decided that you did not deserve the right to step back onto the field. You have to remember that if you play hard you have to support your team hard even if you are pissed off and angry. Do not ever let me see you sulk on the bench again. You can sulk at home but when you are on that field you have a duty to your teammates and this game. Remember that.” Then my coach drove me to get ice cream.

Dancing Coach Lou

Dancing Coach Lou

If you have not caught on my coach in sixth grade was my dad. I call him coach in that story because at that time he was not my father. He was my coach. Even when I was very young my dad created a clear line between dad and coach. A coach will be mean and uncompromising, but a father can also be mean and uncompromising – but he loves you. All jesting aside, when my dad coached me I thought of him as a coach who happened to be my father not the other way around. Still, when he rightfully chastised my behavior I got a double whammy because both my coach and my father were disappointed in me.

After his little talk my dad never mentioned it again. He waited to see what I would do and did not remind me about how to behave for my next game. I was going to either learn the lesson or not. I am pleased to say that I learned how to be a good teammate in trying times. In fact, I focused on becoming the best teammate all of the time. Ever since that verbal dress down in his truck I never once sulked on the sideline no matter how angry I got. I yelled and screamed from the sidelines but I was always positive, always moving, and always urging my team on.

I recount that story because it highlights the best qualities in my father as coach and a dad. He never lost his temper. He thought carefully about how to teach a player and son a necessary lesson. He did not pressure me to change immediately but probably hoped I would. He put the focus on the team and away from my individual problems. Finally, he taught me that a player must act in a manner that reflects the integrity of the game and behave with excellent sportsmanship at all times.

Dad, I know you are proud of me as your son and I hope you will always be proud of the way I respect the game you taught me. Every good thing that lacrosse gave to me came as a result of that lesson you taught me so many years ago. I became a better player, a better teammate, and a better man because of you.

With Pride and Love.

Your Son,
Gordon James Corsetti

Live Blogging Convention Day 2

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What a day. Coach Lou and I had an early morning workout to wake ourselves up. Then it was time to get ready for the opening of the convention. The whole place came together overnight. The live field was ringed with netting and loudspeakers were set up for the coaches attending. The expo featured dozens of companies who were selling all kinds of lacrosse swag and services.

Coach Lou

Coach Lou

Once we were settled, Coach Lou and I went our separate ways. He went to prepare for his presentation and I went to the officials side of the convention center. For six hours I was inundated with new material that will hopefully prepare me for the upcoming season. I must tell you, the caliber of officials speaking at this event is remarkable. I am sitting in rooms with guys who have 15+ years of NCAA officiating experience and they are listening to the same presentation by a referee who has 30+ years in the stripes! It is enough to make you dizzy.

After the officials presentations winded down I headed to the Demo Field to watch my Dad speak about “Six Drills for Speed.” He presented various drills that are designed to expose players to practicing quickly and up-tempo. These drills mimic game speed as good as you can get in practice, and throughout the presentation Coach Lou was throwing balls at players yelling, “faster, quicker!” Roughly 50-60 coaches were seated or standing in the bleachers taking notes, asking questions, or recording the drills. I am certain they will implement at least one of Coach Lou’s drills in their pre-season practice plans.

Wheelchair Lacrosse

Wheelchair Lacrosse

Once Coach Lou was finished speaking I headed into the expo to check out the vendors. This was an experience. Bright colors, crazy logos, weird sticks and heads were all around. I felt like I was in the BrandsMart of Lacrosse. I passed by one booth that stopped me in my tracks. Wheelchair Lacrosse is a group headed by Ryan Baker and Bill Lundstrom that provides instruction in and exhibitions of wheelchair lacrosse. Inspired by wheelchair basketball these guys want to grow the sport of wheelchair lacrosse nationwide to provide another avenue of sport for disabled players young and old. Watching the video of these guys play and taking with Ryan and Bill was truly inspiring. You can look forward to future articles on this sport as AYL and Wheelchair Lacrosse move forward.

After making the rounds of the expo it was time for the keynote address by Jackie Joyner-Kersee. An Olympic Gold Medalist in 1988 and 1992 in the Heptathlon I expected her speech to include how she rose to her success. Instead, she chronicled her defeats and how they fueled her dream to become the most mentally strong athlete at the Olympics. She detailed how her support group of husband, friends, and coaches pushed her hard enough so she could win a gold medal. Her lasting message was that anyone’s dream can be realized but no one can do it on their own.

Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Mrs. Joyner-Kersee’s speech was a fantastic way to open up the convention and explain why lacrosse needs committed coaches and parents so the kids playing the game today will become the champions of tomorrow.

Now, I cannot go into too much detail of the night Coach Lou and I had after the convention wrapped up for the day. Suffice it to say, we had an enjoyable time yukking it up with all of his college buddies. Tune in tomorrow for a recap of Day 3!

Cheers,
Gordon