Tag Archives: gordon corsetti

Be Who You Is

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While walking in downtown Atlanta a few years ago I came upon a street preacher who said the single most grammatically incorrect yet profound statement I ever heard.

Be who you is. ‘Cause if you is who you ain’t. Then you be really messed up.”

That maxim stuck with me over the years but I never put it into practice until a year and a half ago. During middle school I decided I was tired with how I was perceived by my peers. I thought I was considered a bit of a nerd and I set out to change that perception. I started hanging out with different people who were a bit more sport oriented that my other friends. I persisted in changing until I became one of the jocks.

Why is everyone in love with his hair?

Why is everyone in love with his hair?

That image of myself intact in middle school changed drastically when I went to a new high school. Suddenly everything I based my old persona on was nonexistent because nobody knew who I was and I had even harder time fitting in. For a few months I tried making friends but I was this Outside The Perimeter kid with spiked hair surrounded by Inside The Perimeter kids who rocked the Bieber hairstyle before Bieber did. I steeled myself that if no one was going to like me I would become the loner.

So I spent most of high school cultivating this new persona until it consumed me. I rarely talked to any of my peers and I got all of my socializing with twenty and thirty year olds at my gym Tiger Academy of Martial Arts. Despite my complete success with the loner persona I found I was always sad but I had no idea why. I found out years later that working on being someone that I was not was detrimental to my health.

Once high school passed and I moved to college I tried to keep the same persona going because it was all I knew how to do. Being honest, I had lost the ability to socialize well with people my own age. Fortunately for me a few people decided I was worth hanging out with and pulled me kicking and screaming out of my shell. Once out of it I felt like I was breathing fresh air for the first time in four years. I told my goofy jokes and got used to being slightly odd but in an endearing sort of way. This was the beginning of relearning how to be me.

Since that freshman year of college I work almost daily on remembering who I am and how I like to be. My girlfriend Callie even takes a perverse pleasure in reminding me that I am more of a dork than I realize, but she is right. I am a dork and I am ok with that. In fact, I embrace that knowledge about myself and ever since then I became a happier and better person.

Be Yourself

Be Yourself

So to all of the young players we have in our league remember the street preacher’s message. You will find yourself challenged to become someone you are not as you move through school and grow older. Try your best to hold onto what makes you happy with yourself and don’t ever lose it.

Featured Image Credit – www.flickr.com

 

Cheers,
Gordon

AYL 2011 Spring Boys’ Rules

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To view these rules outside of the blog visit: http://ayllax.com/leagues/spring/rules.

In an effort to provide greater understanding of the rules we have posted the specific US Lacrosse Youth Rules that Atlanta Youth Lacrosse supports and enforces. If you have any questions about the rules below please contact our Head Official Gordon Corsetti at rules@ayllax.com.

Rules in RED are US Lacrosse Rules that were modified from the 2010 season. Any rules specific to Atlanta Youth Lacrosse are noted in BOLD GREEEN.

Age Definitions:
Middle School:

Senior Division: 15 and Under. May have competitive divisions grouped by ability.
Junior Division: 13 and Under. May have competitive divisions grouped by ability.

Note: Players 13 years old may have difficulty playing with 15 year old players.

Elementary School:
Lightning Division: 11 and Under. Non-competitive. It is recommended that when multiple teams exist within a program, teams should be balanced as to physical size.

Bantam Division: 9 and Under. Non-competitive. It is recommended that when multiple teams exist within a program, teams should be balanced as to physical size.

Examples, using the U-13 category:

1) A player is 12 years old on 12/31/09 and turns 13 on May 15, 2010. This player is qualified to participate.

2) A player is 13 years old on 12/31/09 and turns 14 on May 15, 2010. This player is NOT qualified to participate.

Format of this Section: Existing NFHSA Rule Section referencefollowed by the corresponding USLYC rule section modification.

Rule 1 – The Game, Field & Equipment

Printable Field Diagram (PDF). View the Field Tutorial.

NFHSA Rule 1, Section 1 — The Game
Lacrosse is played by two teams of 10 players each.

Number of Players
RULE 1 SECTION 1.

10 players per side on the field, however games can be played with as few as 7 per side on the field if coaches agree. All USLYC sponsored events will be played with the regulation 10 players per side.

Field – RULE 1 SECTION 2.

Play on regulation size field is preferred; however the coaches and officials can agree to play on any size field available. USLYC sponsored events will be played on regulation size fields for all groups.

Equipment – RULE 1 SECTIONS 6 & 9.

Equipment will conform to NFHSA crosse dimensions and equipment requirements, including NOCSAE — approved helmets, with the following modifications:

a. The length of the short crosse may be 37 to 40 inches for offensive players in the Lightning and Bantam Divisions and defensive players in such divisions may use a stick with a length of 37 to 72 inches. AYL only allows defensive players to use a long-stick starting in 3rd Grade. Players may not use a long-stick in preK through 2nd Grade.

b. Rib pads are strongly recommended.

Game Jerseys – RULE 1 SECTION 9 ARTICLE 1.

The provisions of the referenced rule subsection need not be strictly enforced at the youth level. A team’s game jerseys should be of a single, dominant color with numbers on the front and back of sufficient size to be clearly visible by game officials anywhere on the field.

RULE 1 SECTION 12.

Spectators and fans will be placed on the opposite side of the field from the table and bench areas. If the field is laid out in a manner that does not allow spectators and fans to be located on the far side of the field, the referee can waive this requirement. When stands or seating facilities are not provided on the opposite side of the field, spectators, fans, and parents will observe the 6-yard spectator limit line on the far side of the field.

Rule 2 – Game Personnel
NFHSA Rule 2, Section 4 — Home Team’s Responsibility

Responsibilities of the home team – RULE 2 SECTION 4.2

a. Home teams are responsible for contrasting jersey colors and will wear pinnies if needed.

b. Sideline Managers – Each team will be asked to provide a designated Sideline Manager (one adult per team, on site, per game-day contest) to help encourage, maintain and manage the sportsmanlike behavior of spectators and fans. See the “Boys’ Youth Rules Addendum”, below, for further information.

Rule 3 – Time Factors and Scoring

NFHS Rule 3 – Sections 1, 3 and 4 – Time Factors and Overtime

Length of Game – RULE 3 SECTION 1.

a. Senior and Junior Division — Two 22-23 minute running time halves. In the event of a tie, two 4-minute sudden-victory overtime periods will be played. If after two overtime periods the score is still tied, additional sudden-victory overtime periods may be played until a winner is determined (provided time permits and coaches and officials are in agreement). Overtime will only be used if time permits. The officials have the final authority to allow an overtime period, a braveheart, or no extra time. In the event that time does not permit an overtime period, the score will be recorded as a tie.

b. Lightning and Bantam Divisions — Two 22-23 minute running time halves. In the event of a tie, one 15-minute running-time overtime period will be played, with the team in the lead at the end of the overtime declared the winner. This is not a sudden victory period. If the score is still tied at the end of the overtime period, the game will end as a tie. Overtime will only be used if time permits. The officials have the final authority to allow an overtime period, a braveheart, or no extra time. In the event that time does not permit an overtime period, the score will be recorded as a tie. NOTE – Overtime is not used in the U9 (Grades 1-2). If the score is tied it will remain tied.

Stalling – Final Two Minutes of Regulation Play
RULE 3 SECTION 3.

This stalling rule shall be enforced for the Junior and Senior Divisions; however this rule will be waived for Lightning and Bantam Divisions.

Rule 4 – Play of the Game
The game is to be played with emphasis on the proper development of stick, team and sportsmanship skills. All divisions will follow NFHS “Play of Game” rules with the following modifications:

Facing Off – RULE 4 SECTION 3

In any game, at any point during a game when there is a five-point lead, the team that is behind will be given the ball at the midfield line in lieu of a face-off as long as the four-point lead is maintained, unless waived by the coach of the trailing team.

Advancing the Ball – RULE 4 SECTION 14 & 15

  • 7/8 Grade –
    • 10-second offensive count
    • 20-second defensive clearing count
    • 4-second goalie crease count
  • 5/6 Grade –
    • 10-second offensive count
    • 20-second defensive clearing count
    • 4-second goalie crease count
  • 3/4 Grade –
    • No offensive 10-second count will be used.
    • No defensive 20-second clearing count will be used
    • 4-second goalie crease count will be used
  • PreK – 2nd Grade –
    • No offensive 10-second count will be used.
    • No defensive 20-second clearing count will be used
    • No 4-second goalie crease count will be used

If a game official detects an effort to stall the advancement of the ball in either the defensive clearing area or the offensive zone outside the offensive box, the official will give a verbal command to “advance the ball” followed by a visual 5-second hand count. If the team so warned does not attempt to advance the ball within the 5-second count, a turnover will occur with restart at the point of the stalling infraction.

Time Out – RULE 4 SECTION 28

Timeouts — One (1) timeout is permitted per half. Time-out length is 1:15 minutes long and the clock DOES NOT stop. Due to a running clock teams/coaches will not be granted a time out if the game clock is below 5:00 minutes.

Rule 5 – Personal and Expulsion Fouls NFHS Rule 5, Section 3 — Illegal body check NOTE: Spearing
NFHS Rule 5, Section 3.1 — Body checking within 5 yards of a loose ball

Body Checking – RULE 5 SECTION 3

Body checking is permitted in Senior and Junior Divisions; however, no take-out checks are permitted by any player. A take out check is defined as any check in which the player lowers his head or shoulder with the force and intent to put the other player on the ground.

Players in the Junior and Senior divisions may make contact in an upright position within five yards of the ball. No body checking of any kind (including man/ball “clear the body” type pushing) is permitted in the Lightning and Bantam Division. If a loose ball is not moving, the referee may re-start play following the alternate possession rule.

NFHS Rule 5, Section 6 — Slashing

Slashing – RULE 5 SECTION 6

Personal Foul/Slashing – For Lightning and Bantam Divisions: Any poke check making contact with an opponent (other than the gloved hand while holding the stick) will be considered a slash. Also, any one-handed check will be considered a slash for the Bantam Division.

NFHS Rule 5, Section 9 — Unsportsmanlike conduct

Unsportsmanlike Conduct – RULE 5 SECTION 9

Personal fouls are to be taken seriously. In addition to the NFHS rules, any player or coach who uses derogatory or profane language (starting with “damn”) on the field or bench, whether addressing a player, coach or referee may receive: first offense, 1 to 3-minute non-releasable unsportsmanlike conduct penalty; second offense a 3-minute non-releasable expulsion foul.

NFHS Rule 5, Section 11 — Ejection

Ejection Fouls – RULE 5 SECTION 11

Players illegally playing down to any division will be ejected for the season and the team will be eliminated from any playoffs and ineligible for any titles or awards.

Rule 6 – Technical Fouls
NFHS Rule 6, Section 10 — Stalling

Stalling – RULE 6 SECTION 10

Senior and Junior Divisions: the team with the lead must keep the ball in the goal area during the last two minutes of the game. Lightning and Bantam Divisions are excused from this rule.

Rule 7 – Penalty Enforcement
NFHSA Rule 7, Sections 1, 2 & 3

Time Serving Penalties – RULE 7 SECTIONS 1, 2 & 3

Time serving penalties are enforced and man up situations are permitted in all divisions except the Bantam Division (U9), where there are no time-serving penalties; instead the player must be substituted for and the ball awarded to the other team at the point of the infraction. In the Bantam Division, if the official feels that a player should be removed from the field for a brief period of time so the coach may explain the reason for his penalty then that player will be removed from the game. That player is eligible to return after being spoken to about the proper way to check.

Game Termination

Officials will have authority to terminate a boys’ youth game in response to flagrant acts of unsportsmanlike behavior by coaches, athletes, spectators, or fans. A game termination will be the last resort in insuring the players’ safety and preserving the integrity of the game. If possible, game officials will issue at least one strong warning that the game is in danger of being terminated. However, it is conceivable that games may be terminated on the first instance of a flagrant unsportsmanlike act. Every effort should be taken to avoid game termination, including the enforcement of existing rules for team-conduct penalties, unsportsmanlike-conduct penalties, and ejection fouls. Mechanics for terminating a game for flagrant unsportsmanlike behavior can be found at the US Lacrosse webpage referenced above. All games terminated by a US Lacrosse Official, will result in a 1-0 victory for the team that is innocent of the terminal offense(s). It is recommended that the game should count in league statistics as a full game, and all goals, assists, saves, and other team statistics should count toward team and league records.

Boys’ Youth Rules Addendum
The US Lacrosse Youth Council has endorsed the addition of the following guidelines intended to address the issues of proper conduct both on and off the field at boys’ youth lacrosse events. These guidelines are designed to support the kind of environment for our youth athletes that will keep them playing lacrosse and provide them with such a positive experience that they will remain in the game and later give back to the sport as coaches, officials, and parents who encourage their own children to play.

Guideline 1 — Game Administration (Refers to Rule 1-12) Spectators and Teams on Opposite Sides of Field
Spectators and fans will be placed on the opposite side of the field from the table and bench areas. If the field is laid out in a manner that does not allow spectators and fans to be located on the far side of the field, the referee can waive this requirement. When stands or seating facilities are not provided on the opposite side of the field, spectators, fans, and parents will observe the 6-yard spectator limit line on the far side of the field.

Guideline 2 — Game Personnel [Refers to Rule 2-11] Sideline Managers
Each youth lacrosse team will be asked to provide a designated Sideline Manager (one adult per team, on site, per game-day contest) to help encourage, maintain and manage the sportsmanlike behavior of spectators and fans. These adults would be responsible for insuring that the spectators and fans support the athletes, coaches and officials in a positive manner and refrain from behavior not in conformity with the US Lacrosse Code of Conduct. The Sideline Managers will receive training prior to these contests by reviewing the document “Sideline Manager Job Description” provided by US Lacrosse and the US Lacrosse – Positive Coaching Alliance, available online, or by requesting a paper copy of this document through their local US Lacrosse Chapter. Sideline managers will introduce themselves to the officials prior to the coin toss, and follow those procedures outlined in the Sideline Manager Job Description, found at the referenced US Lacrosse website location. Sideline Managers will notify an unruly fan or spectator that unsportsmanlike behavior may lead to ejection and/or a game cancellation by the officials, under Game Termination – Guideline 4.

Guideline 4 — Game Personnel [Refers to Rule 7-14] Game Termination
Officials will have authority to terminate a boys’ youth game in response to flagrant acts of unsportsmanlike behavior by coaches, athletes, spectators, or fans. A game termination will be the last resort in insuring the players’ safety and preserving the integrity of the game. If possible, game officials will issue at least one strong warning that the game is in danger of being terminated. However, it is conceivable that games may be terminated on the first instance of a flagrant unsportsmanlike act. Every effort should be taken to avoid game termination, including the enforcement of existing rules for team-conduct penalties, unsportsmanlike-conduct penalties, and ejection fouls. Mechanics for terminating a game for flagrant unsportsmanlike behavior can be found at the US Lacrosse webpage referenced above. All games terminated by a US Lacrosse Official, will result in a 1-0 victory for the team that is innocent of the terminal offense(s). It is recommended that the game should count in league statistics as a full game, and all goals, assists, saves, and other team statistics should count toward team and league records.

Once again, if you have any questions about the above rules please contact our Head Official Gordon Corsetti at rules@ayllax.com.

Cheers,
Gordon

Live Blogging Convention Wrap Up

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Awaking from a truly restful night of sleep Coach Lou and I again headed into the cavernous convention hall. We split ways to view presentations by officials and coaches at the top of their field. Rich Tamberino, an official with over 30 years experience, presented on Mental Checklists. The amount of information that he covers with his officials before a game is astonishing. They go over nearly every aspect I can imagine about a lacrosse game before they ever step onto the field. I had my eyes opened very wide at the end of his talk as I realized how much more work I need to put into each game I officiate this season. To do anything less would dishonor the profession.

Verbal Judo

Verbal Judo

After Tamberino’s presentation I attended the one speech that left me breathless by the end of it. Verbal Judo Vice President W. Lee Fjelstad spoke about his involvement in Verbal Judo. A company that speaks to hundreds of companies and law enforcement officers every year on effective techniques to get people to do what you want during confrontations. Since officiating could very well be described as a “C*#@p attracting profession” this presentation was immensely helpful in illuminating both sides of a confrontation and how to use certain words and phrases to my advantage. By the end of the speech I had a full sheet of notes and my belly was hurting from laughing through Mr. Fjelstad’s well told stories. If anyone works in an environment where better communication would benefit you I would highly suggest attending one of his Verbal Judo Classes.

After that entertaining speech I headed to the expo to find some swag and my dad. What I found instead was The Watermelon Challenge! Demonstrated by pro MLL players the target is one lonely watermelon ten yards away. The

Death to all Watermelons!

Death to all Watermelons!

objective? Complete watermelon obliteration! The pros lined up and ripped shot after shot until one of them hit the mark. The watermelon split open as if shot. Pieces of watermelon littered the ground in a sticky, but delicious mess. With the watermelon defeated it’s remains were passed out to some astonished youth players who carried it around as reverently as the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch (if you do not get that reference then shame on you).

After that it was back to class. I will not bore you with the details of 2-man mechanics, and rules interpretations but I will mention that the NFHS and US Lacrosse is extremely serious about removing as much head-to-head contact and body-to-head contact as possible in the game. Officials are being instructed and encouraged to call fouls that result in contact to an opponent’s head as a one minute non-releasable Illegal Body Check. This is a new emphasis over last year, and if anyone read my post on Mouthgards and Concussions this emphasis makes a lot of sense. Expect to see helmet-to-helmet contact penalized more often and more severely during the 2011 regular season. Please players, keep your head up and start your body checks from a lower crouch. You will save a lot of wear and tear on your head and spine if you do so.

With all of the classes over for the day I went out with all of the officials to Pickels Pub next to the Orioles Ball Park. Everyone shared a few drinks and some hilarious stories but eventually it was time to call it a night. Coach Lou and I met up, he had gone out with the Youth Council members, and crashed as soon as we got back to the room. With the convention all wrapped up there was nothing left to do but take a cab to BWI and board the flight home.

I must say my first convention experience was an absolute blast and well worth the expense of going. If you are a coach, official, or a player I would highly recommend checking it out when it moves to Philadelphia in 2012. I had a fantastic time with my Dad. As a Father/Son trip this one definitely goes into the top three.

Cheers,
Gordon