Tag Archives: Coach Lou

KIDS HELPING KIDS

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For those of you that do not know about our STAR (Students That Accept Responsibility) take a look at this terrific article about the Tidewater Lacrosse program.  http://www.uslacrosse.org/blog/youthful-ambassadors-spreading-lacrosse-goodwill

This year will mark the 18th time I will speaking at the US Lacrosse National Convention in Baltimore.  I will be presenting our STAR program which was the brainchild of my wife Mary Jo 10 years ago.  The STAR program much like the Tidewater youth ambassadors (mentioned in the above article) is something that young people can wrap their arms around and help others.  Our STAR’s are committed young men/women who want to help spread the great game of lacrosse.

About the STAR program:

Our STAR’s are upstanding members of the community that recognize the value of volunteering their time and energy to provide a wonderful experience to everyone who comes out to enjoy lacrosse. As the name implies, we cultivate a culture of responsibility at our fields where our volunteers are expected to show up on time, work hard, engage with the players and coaches, assume leadership roles and, most importantly, have fun.

The Intangibles

  • S.T.A.R.s learn how to behave professionally in a work environment
  • They learn how to properly communicate their availability through e-mail
  • As our S.T.A.R.s grow older their responsibilities grow as well.
  • S.T.A.R.s learn how to use criticism to their advantage because occasionally mistakes will happen. We do not shy from critiquing the work of any S.T.A.R. but we do provide an environment where mistakes are okay because they are the only way to learn.

Volunteer Hours

Many schools in Georgia require volunteer hours, many colleges like seeing applicants who have volunteered in their community. Our S.T.A.R. program provides ample opportunities for students to accumulate  volunteer hours along with the potential to earn a paycheck.

S.T.A.R.s are a very visible part of our lacrosse program and they understand that their actions while working reflect the character of Atlanta Youth Lacrosse.
We expect all of our volunteers to respect players, parents, and their fellow volunteers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Putting it in perspective

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I came across this wonderful article (see below link) a few days ago and thought it would be a good time to post it.

Kate Leavell from US Lacrosse,  wrote this this very thoughtful piece which puts things into perspective when talking about youth sports.

I have been coaching for over 35 years and I have seem many things.

Some things make me scratch my head and others make me smile ear to ear.   I was having a conversation with one of our parents a few weeks ago and we were

talking about the pressure for kids to play year round sports or if they miss a season their child will fall behind.  She said her husband was told if their son missed baseball this spring

he would be way behind his peers.  Her response was classic and made me crack up “He is freaking seven for Pete’s sake”.

All to often we feel the need to push our young players into something that they:

  1. Don’t want
  2. Don’t get enjoyment out of

While it is important to guide our young people it is also important to make sure they are having fun and developing.  We should embrace the fact that they are passionate about something that is bigger than they are.

I highly recommend that you read this article.  It may give you a fresh meaning on another aspect of sports that we sometimes miss as parents and coaches.

Parents enjoy the moment article

See ya on the field!

 

Coach Lou

Tough enough

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As our spring season draws near I wanted our Mom’s and Dad’s to understand a little different part of the game and how to feel about seeing your son get checked with a stick.

I have seen many things in our beloved-ed game.  I used to hear people say ” I can hit that kid with the stick” or “I love this game, it’s just like Football with sticks”.  I detest comments like these because that is not what the game is about.

lm     Growing up as the youngest of four boys and in a neighborhood of thirty or so boys in a two block radius I got roughed up quite a bit.  My oldest brother would pound my second oldest brother who would pound my third oldest brother who would pound me.  This was a daily occurrence in our house as well as the Sunday afternoon boxing matches in our garage where our Dad played referee.  My Mom hated it and refused to watch and my Dad’s response was “the boys need to learn how to protect themselves”.  I always wondered about my big sister who never had to strap on the gloves… How come she did not need to know how to protect herself.  I love my sister dearly but boy I would have loved to get a few punches in.  Those were sure different times.

Today there is more structure growing up and more social awareness of rough housing.

In the game of lacrosse you will see players get pushed, slashed, tripped and cross checked.  All of these are fouls in the game of lacrosse but sometimes the officials do not see every infraction and the call is not made.  As a coach and parent you worry about your players as well as your children.  No one wants to see a player injured.  That being said Lacrosse is a very rough game and these infractions will occur regardless of the official.

All of our coaches are instructed to teach the proper fundamentals to each and every player as well as penalties.  We are always looking to help make sure the game is safer for all of our players.

The link below from the Georgia High School Officials Association has some great videos of the rules and fouls that occur in a game.  This is a tremendous resource if you would like to learn more about the game.

http://galaxref.com/training/resources/

I try to tell young kids and older players that you will get pushed, slashed, tripped and cross checked and you have to deal with it.  This is what I call being “tough enough”.  All to often we want to retaliate or question the official.  The best course of action is to walk away and keep playing hard.  That’s what a gamer does (please understand, I am not talking about a video gamer).  A gamer is someone that plays aggressive hard nosed lacrosse and never gives up constantly pushing himself and his teammates to succeed.

Every child/player is different.  Some players are more aggressive than others.  So when you are watching your child play and you see him get roughed up a little,  don’t get on him for not being tough.  Let him understand that you just need to be “tough enough”

The web site below is a humorous way of describing roughhousing and how important it is for children.

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/02/07/the-importance-of-roughhousing-with-your-kids/

I wish my parents had this resource when I was growing up it would have saved me several trips to the emergency room.

See ya on the field,

 

Coach Lou