Tag Archives: box

Data

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Over the last few hours I read every form submission from the last two and a half years that came through on the page www.ayllax.com/contact. This form along with the two email addresses: info@ayllax.com and rules@ayllax.com, are critical for good communication between our AYL staff and our members.

So here is the data I collected from the form:

  • League Question – 313 submissions
  • Payment Question – 73 submission
  • Coyote Question – 30 submissions
  • Group/Private Lesson – 37 submissions
  • Concern or Suggestion – 17 submissions
  • Other (anything not listed above) – 260 submissions
  • Total submissions = 730

data-graph

As with all statistics the question is “what do the numbers mean?” Well, the numbers tell me a good deal:

  1. Many individuals have questions regarding our league. From what times games and practices are held, to who coaches our teams, to how to get on the waitlist. That last question is particularly popular. I am going to be spending this week going over the Leagonue Question submissions and crafting a more comprehensive FAQ page, which I hope will address many of these queries.
  2. Considering the large amount of members we have at each level, there were less Payment Questions than I anticipated. I believe this is a result of our move to League Toolbox, which has significantly streamlined our registration system. The majority of submissions were in regards to the AYL refund policy, which can be found on the FAQ page under “registration.”
  3. FYI – group/private lessons are generally held during the winter and summer months. This is when our college players and coaches come back to Atlanta from their campuses. In the spring and fall seasons, we do more clinics than private and group instruction. If you do have questions about our group and private lessons email me at rules@ayllax.com.
  4. The fact that there were only seventeen submissions regarding Concerns and Suggestions tells me that AYL is doing a real solid job with our league. That being said, I believe strongly that critiques, even over little things, can make our league better. So I created an anonymous “Suggestion Box,” which anyone can drop a suggestion and our staff will review it. I certainly would consider making a suggestion if my name was not tied to it, which is why this form is completely anonymous.
  5. “Other” is the second highest submission topic. Based off the submissions I’ve added two new subject which are routed to the appropriate AYL staff member for review. Those topics are “Rule Questions,” and “Advertise/Sponsor.”

Well, there is some data. Remember, if you’ve got questions we will answer them as best as we can!

Cheers,
Gordon

Keep it in the Box!

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Rule 3, Section 3 – Final Two Minutes of Play

  • “During the final two minutes of regulation play, stalling rules will be in effect. The team that is ahead will be warned to ‘keep it in’ once the ball has been brought into its respective goal area.”

This Spring, we are fortunate in having a number of close, competitive games. Many of these games are ending with a two or one goal advantage for the other team. Because of these close games, “keeping it in the box” is becoming more and more important for both teams. This post will hopefully eliminate any confusion or ambiguity regarding the final two minutes of play for AYL games.

Below is the breakdown of advancement rules for each age group. The blue line focuses on the final two minutes of play. 1-4th graders are not required to keep the ball in the box during the final two minutes. However, 5-8th graders are required to do so if their team is leading during the final two minutes.

  • 7/8 Grade –
    • 10-second offensive count
    • 20-second defensive clearing count
    • 4-second goalie crease count
    • Last two minutes – leading team keeps ball in the box
  • 5/6 Grade –
    • 10-second offensive count
    • 20-second defensive clearing count
    • 4-second goalie crease count
    • Last two minutes – leading team keeps ball in the box
  • 3/4 Grade –
    • No offensive 10-second count will be used.
    • No defensive 20-second clearing count will be used
    • 4-second goalie crease count will be used
    • Last two minutes – no keeping it in the box for either team

That covers what the AYL age groups do, but what is “keep it in” exactly?

In years past, a leading team would give the ball to their fastest player and had them run around their offensive half of the field until the clock ran out. While that strategy was effective, it was incredibly boring to watch. Imagine how much fun it is watching one player run back and forth around a space that is 50 yards long and 60 yards wide, while the entire defense tries desperately to catch up. Ask Coach Lou. He was the fast attackman that was told to run away from the defense whenever his team was leading with two minutes left to go.

Rule 3, Section 3 is designed to correct the above situation, and give the losing team an opportunity to check the ball away and score. When a team is ahead by any amount of goals and the clock hits 2:00 minutes in the fourth quarter. That team is required to keep the ball in the box as soon as they step the ball into the box. If they ball leaves the box, and the leading team touched it last, the whistle is blown, and the ball is awarded to the losing team. The exception is on a shot. Where whichever team is closest to the ball gets the ball.

Stall Signal - NFHS Rulebook pg.84

Stall Signal - NFHS Rulebook pg.84

As soon as the leading team brings the ball into the box, the officials will yell “Keep it in,” and display the stalling signal for everyone to say. It is the responsibility of the leading team to know that once they step into the box, they may not step out of it.

 

 

 

The diagram below illustrates where players must keep the ball in if they are leading during the last two minutes of the game:

Box It

Box It

If anyone is still unclear about “keeping it in the box,” please comment below. Or, you may email me at rules@ayllax.com.

Featured Image Credit – www.flickr.com

Cheers,
Gordon