Category Archives: Parents

Injury Prevention

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As we prepare for the upcoming season it is important to be in shape and have the ability to run around and have fun.

The Spring season is right around the corner and all of our young athletes should be working on their stick work and doing some running and agility training.

I came across this article and I thought it was important to share with our players and parents.  All to often we rush our players from school or another event and we don’t think about injury prevention.

As adults it is our responsibility to help young players understand what they can do to prevent injuring themselves.

Growing up many of us were outside 100 percent of our free time.  Young people today may not have that luxury as they have many outside influences that can cut down on free play and just running around.

I suggest that everyone read this article as a family and try and perform some of these skills.  You don’t need a personal training and you can do all of these drills in your driveway or back yard.

 

Injury Prevention for Young Athletes

 

Looking forward to seeing you all on the field soon…Coach Lou

 

 

KIDS HELPING KIDS

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For those of you that do not know about our STAR (Students That Accept Responsibility) take a look at this terrific article about the Tidewater Lacrosse program.  http://www.uslacrosse.org/blog/youthful-ambassadors-spreading-lacrosse-goodwill

This year will mark the 18th time I will speaking at the US Lacrosse National Convention in Baltimore.  I will be presenting our STAR program which was the brainchild of my wife Mary Jo 10 years ago.  The STAR program much like the Tidewater youth ambassadors (mentioned in the above article) is something that young people can wrap their arms around and help others.  Our STAR’s are committed young men/women who want to help spread the great game of lacrosse.

About the STAR program:

Our STAR’s are upstanding members of the community that recognize the value of volunteering their time and energy to provide a wonderful experience to everyone who comes out to enjoy lacrosse. As the name implies, we cultivate a culture of responsibility at our fields where our volunteers are expected to show up on time, work hard, engage with the players and coaches, assume leadership roles and, most importantly, have fun.

The Intangibles

  • S.T.A.R.s learn how to behave professionally in a work environment
  • They learn how to properly communicate their availability through e-mail
  • As our S.T.A.R.s grow older their responsibilities grow as well.
  • S.T.A.R.s learn how to use criticism to their advantage because occasionally mistakes will happen. We do not shy from critiquing the work of any S.T.A.R. but we do provide an environment where mistakes are okay because they are the only way to learn.

Volunteer Hours

Many schools in Georgia require volunteer hours, many colleges like seeing applicants who have volunteered in their community. Our S.T.A.R. program provides ample opportunities for students to accumulate  volunteer hours along with the potential to earn a paycheck.

S.T.A.R.s are a very visible part of our lacrosse program and they understand that their actions while working reflect the character of Atlanta Youth Lacrosse.
We expect all of our volunteers to respect players, parents, and their fellow volunteers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And another reason why we coach

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Over the years people have asked me why I coach.  A good deal of my answers revolve around the fun I have watching young people excel at something that they are passionate about.

It could be the first time they pick up a ground ball, score their first goal, make a nice check or a great save.  Sometimes it is the thrill of being in a close game and trying to make all the correct decisions to give your team the chance to succeed.

It could be achieving a team goal or a championship.  I have coached at every level (except pro) and I have seen wonderful things on and off the field.

This past weekend in the town of Farmville, Virginia, Legendary Hampden  Sydney Head Coach Ray Rostan bid farewell to his last senior class.  The importance of this day did not go unnoticed by people that are involved in our great game.

This marks the 37th year that coach Rostan has patrolled the sidelines, 31 years for the Hampden Sydney Tigers.  Coach Ray has amassed over 300 wins in his career and he decided this year he would retire.  By way of the Facebook posts I have seen the last few days there looked like hundreds of former players attended Coach Ray’s last home game before competing in the ODAC, NCAA qualifying tournament.  They defeated a very good and nationally ranked Lynchburg team (last years NCAA runner-ups) 13-9.

I first met Coach Ray at the US Lacrosse Convention some ten years ago.  As one of the convention committee chairs I was responsible for getting coaches to speak at the national event.  I had spoken with coach several times over the phone and we hit it off right away.  Could it be that he was from Copiague, Long Island and I was from West Babylon (bitter rivals) or that he coached several of my players (Bobby Fulton, David Beman, Brad Mostowy) and guys I coached with (John Pritzlaff & Ryan Harrington).

I asked Coach what he wanted to talk about and he said how about shooting.  Now mind you we had several professional players that were going to talk about shooting so I was a little hesitant to have another shooting presentation.  But I said sure that’s fine coach.  Coach Ray brought his long time assistant Jay (who happens to be his son) and they put on a shooting display that people still talk about today.  Coach Ray was happy to rip corners and put balls where ever he wanted.  Not only was he a great speaker but he was able to demonstrate the art of shooting a lacrosse ball in layman’s terms and everyone that was in attendance were very impressed.

Coach Ray is just a genuine all and all good guy.  He always takes your call he answers emails (sometimes not timely) and is always there if you need him for any reason.  Not only did he impact many players during his career but he impacted many Moms and Dads and siblings.

So to answer my question Why do I coach?  It’s because of guys like Ray Rostan who don’t do it for fanfare, prestige, money or fame.  They do it because they want to make a positive impact on young people’s lives.  Coach Ray is a DIAMOND in the rough and we will all miss him a great deal.

From one Coach to another…THANK YOU COACH RAY you have blessed all of us.

ray