Author Archives: Lou Corsetti

About Lou Corsetti

Gordon is a born lacrosse official who played for ten years before realizing he'd much rather ref the game than play it. He lives in Atlanta, Georgia and officiates youth, high school, and collegiate men's lacrosse games all over the southeast. His passion is educating and training officials, coaches, players, parents and all other fans on the rules of lacrosse, it's history, and how best to develop lacrosse in new areas.

Thank Goodness for smart thinking

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The Intercollegiate Men’s Lacrosse Coaches Association recently voted unanimously to stop the recruiting madness by not allowing players to commit to playing until their junior year (see article below).  This comes on the heals of the IWLCA (Women’s Coaches Association)  who voted on this same topic a few weeks ago.  This is a breath of fresh air provided the NCAA goes along with the process and makes this happen.  Now young people can mature and develop without having the stress that comes along with getting recruited.  All too often players and their parents listen to the hype or jump program to program in search of the next shiny thing.  I have seen a lot during my over 40 years involved in our great sport and 90 percent of it is great and 10 percent makes you wonder what the world is coming to.  We have freshman and sophomores committing to colleges and universities and they have not played a single minute of high school varsity lacrosse.  The insanity had to stop at some point.   We have many wonderful people who help guide our players during the process and there are many unscrupulous club programs that promise the moon and the stars.  I am so glad that the NCAA coaches have come to this monumental decision.

I talk to college coaches along with several of my colleagues that coach High School lacrosse on a weekly basis and they could not me more thrilled.  I believe all coaches (college, high school and club) were doing a disservice to these players because they are just not developed enough.  As the sport of lacrosse started to explode a few years ago it became an arms race to get as many kids in your program as you possible.  Whoever had the ability to stick to it college coaches could roll the dice.

Many of my coaching brethren when we played did not commit to playing in college until junior and sometimes fall of our senior years.  I know that was the case for me and I am glad for it.  I was not mature enough to make a choice like that and it was a hard decision as senior.  Think about if you were a freshman.

So parents, players, fans and coaches take heed.  Do your research and find out the best college choice for you.  It’s a 4o to 50 year decision and you don’t have to make it as a 9th or 10th grader.

Kudo’s to the IMLCA for recognizing this fault and putting corrective measures in place.

 

IMLCA Article

 

See ya on the field!

 

Coach Lou

US Lacrosse…always playing by the rules!

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My son Gordon who runs officiating training for US Lacrosse in Baltimore recently published a face-off video (listed below) with Greg Gurenlian The 2015 MVP of the MLL.

Greg who runs Face-Off Academy is arguably one of the best face-off players in the world.  What is more impressive is he won the 2015 USL/MLL Sportsmanship Player of the Year.  This is important to note because in the video he shows officials how they can spot a cheater at the Face-Off X.

I think Greg did a wonderful job in this video because he is showing officials and players how to recognize someone that is breaking the rules.  Sports are difficult enough without someone trying to tarnish the image of the game by bending the rules and “Cheating”.

While I have never met Greg personally I think it is refreshing that he points out these rule infractions for everyone to see.  I am sure he has faced-off thousands of times and seen many of these methods.

US Lacrosse our governing body as well as the education experts in our sport do a terrific job teaching the fundamentals the right way and playing by the rules.  Atlanta Youth Lacrosse are tireless supporters of the US Lacrosse mission as well as playing the game the right way.

Our motto “Fun, Fundamentals, Sportsmanship and Honoring the Game” are the cornerstones of our program.

Lets give a big thank you to Greg, Gordon and US Lacrosse for doing things the right way!

 

 

Do the math

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I came across this web site recently (http://www.scholarshipstats.com/lacrosse.html) and I thought it was great information to share with our players and parents.    The web site shows the number of Division I, II and III programs in the country (Division III does not award scholarships) as well as the tuition costs, room and board costs, number of athletic scholarships, roster size, SAT scores for admission and the financial assistance percentage each player receives on average.  I speak with and meet regularly  with players, parents and college coaches to help our players with the recruiting process.  It is a fun and interesting journey.  The dream of a scholarship is within reach (for some) but I constantly preach about the importance of education and excelling in school because that is where the real money is.  Until lacrosse is mainstream and people can make an actual living at it we will continue to see the disparity of athletic scholarships among sports.  Football and Basketball are mainstream sports and have fully funded programs.  Baseball has scholarships along with the allure of minor league baseball.  Lacrosse struggles to be relevant even though it is the most rapidly growing youth sport in the country.  This chart illustrates the point I am making:

Number of High School players:                          Men 106,720          Women    81,969

Number of College Lacrosse players                  Men   13,857          Women     10,869

% of High School Players in competing in College   Men 13%          Women      13.3%

NCAA Division I men’s Lacrosse teams have an average roster size of 45 players but only a maximum of 12.6 scholarships to award per team. This means that the average award covers less than 30% of a typical athlete’s annual college costs. Lacrosse is an equivalency sport for NCAA limits, so partial scholarships can be awarded (up to 30 per team in NCAA I) as long as the combined equivalent awards do not exceed the limit. For example, an NCAA Division I school can award 24 women lacrosse players each a 1/2 scholarship and still meet the limit of 12 per team.

This web site is one of the best information sources I have seen as it gives a true picture of what is out there for our players.  I strongly suggest that you review this information as a family so you can make an educated decision when choosing a school that is right for you.

Don’t get caught up with DI vs DII vs DIII it’s a zero sum game.

See ya on the field,

Coach Lou